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About yoga

The Patanjali Yoga Sutras   is the most popular influencer for wisdom, concepts, and practices of yoga even for modern yoga cultures today ...

Path of yoga

Yoga is a group of physical, mental, and spiritual practices or disciplines which originated in ancient India it means union it is a spiritual science of self-realisation there are many kind of yoga as follow but the aim of all is same



1.Karma Yoga or the Path of Action (karma)- Karma yoga is the yoga of action or work; specifically, karma yoga is the path of dedicated work. it is the path of action, or selfless service towards others The intention when practicing karma yoga is to give selflessly for the good of others without thought of one's self or attachment to the results of one's actions. Acting in this way is considered the right way to approach service and it is said to purify the mind.


2.Bhakti Yoga or the Path of Devotion (bhakti) - Bhakti as a form of union with the Infinite must be as old as human civilization. Bhakti Yoga  is union through love and devotion." Bhakti yoga, like any other form of yoga, is a path to self-realization, to having an experience of oneness with everything.


3.Jnana Yoga or the Path of Knowledge (jnana) - Jnana is knowledge, and refers to any cognitive event that is correct and true over time. Jnana yoga is the yoga of knowledge—not knowledge in the intellectual sense—but the knowledge of Brahman and Atman and the realization of their unity. it requiring great strength of will and intellect. In Jnana yoga, the mind is used to inquire into its own nature and to transcend the mind’s identification with its thoughts and ego

4.Raja Yoga, Yoga of mind and emotions-Raja Yoga is referred to as the Mental Yoga, or the Yoga of the Mind, because it emphasis on awareness of one's state of mind. It is through this practice of concentration that one learns to calm the mind and bring it to one point of focus. It is at this point that we direct our attention inwardly, toward our true nature, which is Divine. You can achieve this by following the Eight-Fold Path of Raja Yoga, which is called astang yoga



5.Hatha Yoga.- Hatha Yoga stems from a deep understanding of the mechanics of the body, and uses yogic postures, or yogasanas, to enable the system to sustain higher dimensions of energy Hatha Yoga, which literally means “union through discipline of force”, is a school of Yoga that stresses mastery of the body as a way of attaining a state of spiritual perfection in which the mind is withdrawn from external objects. Hatha Yoga has grown in popularity in the West as a form of exercise that develops strength, flexibility, bodily relaxation, and mental concentration




6.Ashtanga Yoga- Ashtanga yoga literally means "eight-limbed yoga," as outlined by the sage Patanjali in the Yoga Sutras. According to Patanjali, the path of internal purification for revealing the Universal Self consists of the following eight spiritual practices it is a way to achieve rajayoga

7.Vinyasa Yoga-Vinyasa is a style of yoga characterized by stringing postures together so that you move from one to another, seamlessly, using breath.  Commonly referred to as “flow” yoga, Vinyasa Yoga, much like the other forms of yoga, stems from Hatha Yoga. Vinyasa refers to the alignment of breath with movement. This turns the otherwise static asanas into a more dynamic flow.The modern forms of Vinyasa flow, also called the Power Yoga and flow, are commonly described as a freestyle Ashtanga. They don’t stick to the rigid structure of the practice Get your flow on in this dynamic practice that links Movement and breath together


8.Iyengar Yoga- Iyengar Yoga is a form of Hatha yoga founded by B.K.S. Iyengar an Indian yoga teacher born  14 December 1918. He was awarded with the Padma Shri in 1991, the Padma Bhushan in 2002 and the Padma Vibhushan in 2014 by Indian government,this yoga keeps  close attention to anatomical details and the alignment of each posture, Iyengar Yoga is the practice of precision. Poses are held for long periods and often modified with props. This method is designed to systematically cultivate strength, flexibility, stability, and awareness, and can be therapeutic for specific conditions.

9.Hot Yoga-  yoga exercises performed under hot and humid conditions. They have some series of poses. Some breathing exercise some time room heated to 35–42 °C (95–108 °F) with a humidity of 40% but the heat in hot yoga varies depending on the practice or the individual. Some teacher says they are replicate the heat and humidity of India where yoga originated



10.Bikram Yoga– it is a type of hot yoga it is started by Bikram Choudhury an Indian yoga teacher born  on  February 10, 1944 . this yoga is performed in a series of 26 hatha yoga postures done in a hot environment of 40 °C It became popular in the early 1970s

11.Kundalini Yoga  the Yoga-Kundalini Upanishad was compiled in the first half of the 17th century technical term particular to this tradition, is actually a synthesis of many traditions which may include haṭha yoga techniques (such as bandhapranayama, and asana), Patañjali's kriya yoga (consisting of self-discipline, self-study, and devotion to God), tantric visualization and meditation techniques of laya yoga (known as samsketas), and other techniques oriented towards the 'awakening of kundalini' Swami Sivananda (1935) introduced many readers to "Kundalini Yoga" with his book on the subject in 1935. This book has in-depth details about Kundalini Yoga


12.Yin Yoga- Yin yoga is a slow-paced style of yoga with postures, or asanas, that are held for longer periods of time—for beginners, it may range from 45 seconds to two minutes; more advanced practitioners may stay in one asana for five minutes or more  The practice of performing series of long-held floor poses one after the other was first introduced in North America in the late 1970s by Paulie Zink, a martial arts champion and Taoist yoga teacher and practitioner He later called this synthesis "Yin and Yang yoga," or often "Yin yoga" for short. Yin Yoga has the same goals and objectives as any other school of yoga; however, it directs the stimulation normally created in the asana portion of the practice deeper than the superficial or muscular tissues (which we are calling the yang tissues). Yin Yoga targets the connective tissues, such as the ligaments, bones, and even the joints of the body that normally are not exercised very much in a more active style of asana practice

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      "Arise! Awake! And stop not until the goal is reached." 

    
Swami Vivekananda is considered as a key figure in the introduction of Yoga to the Western world. Vivekananda described Yoga as a practice that joins a human to "reality" or "God". 
The Hindu concentrated on the internal world, upon the unseen realms in the Self, and developed the science of Yoga. Yoga is controlling the senses, will and mind. The benefit of its study is that we learn to control instead of being controlled. Mind seems to be layer on layer. Our real goal is to cross all these intervening strata of our being and find God. The end and aim of Yoga is to realise God. To do this we must go beyond relative knowledge, go beyond the sense-world. The world is awake to the senses, the children of the Lord are asleep on that plane. The world is asleep to the Eternal, the children of the Lord are awake in that realm. These are the sons of God. There is but one way to control the senses—to see Him who is the Reality in the universe. Then and only then can we really conquer our senses.  


Swami Vivekananda has influenced young minds to walk on the path of enlightenment for more than a centennial. Stretching his wings of spirituality out to the world, he started a revolution which still resonates among millions of his followers 
Every man must develop according to his own nature. As every science has its methods, so has every religion. The methods of attaining the end of religion are called Yoga by us, and the different forms of Yoga that we teach, are adapted to the different natures and temperaments of men. We classify them in the following way, under four heads:
(1) Karma-Yoga—The manner in which a man realises his own divinity through works and duty.
(2) Bhakti-Yoga—The realisation of the divinity through devotion to, and love of, a Personal God.
(3) Raja-Yoga—The realisation of the divinity through the control of mind.
(4) Jnana-Yoga—The realisation of a man's own divinity through knowledge.


These are all different roads leading to the same centre—God. Indeed, the varieties of religious belief are an advantage, since all faiths are good,so far as they encourage man to lead a religious life. The more sects there are, the more opportunities there are for making successful appeals to the divine instinct in all men. 
Each one of our Yogas is fitted to make man perfect even without the help of the others, because they have all the same goal in view. The Yogas of work, of wisdom, and of devotion are all capable of serving as direct and independent means for the attainment of Moksha. "Fools alone say that work and philosophy are different, not the learned.” The learned know that, though apparently different from each other, they at last lead to the same goal of human perfection.
Without non-attachment there cannot be any kind of Yoga. Non-attachment is the basis of all the Yogas. The man who gives up living in houses, wearing fine clothes, and eating good food, and goes into the desert, may be a most attached person. His only possession, his own body, may become everything to him; and as he lives he will be simply struggling for the sake of his body. Non-attachment does not mean anything that we may do in relation to our external body, it is all in the mind. The binding link of "I and mine" is in the mind. If we have not this link with the body and with the things of the senses, we are non-attached, wherever and whatever we may be. A man may be on a throne and perfectly non-attached; another man may be in rags and still very much attached. First, we have to attain this state of non-attachment and then to work incessantly. 
From a young age, he took delight in various subjects, including religion, philosophy, art, literature and social sciences. He was also drawn towards the sacred books of the Hindu religion. Bewitched in the charm of the wandering monks, he started meditating before the idols of Lord Shiva, Lord Rama and Mahavir Hanuman.
Curiosity in his eyes and the desire to get closer to the supreme power, he once asked his Guru, Sri Ramakrishna, “Have you seen God?” Without any qualms, his master replied, “Yes, I have. I see Him as clearly as I see you, only in a much intenser sense.” 


reference taken from The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda